Max Parker (The Game Guy)

Max Parker (The Game Guy)

ScufLogoFinally, a company other than Microsoft gets to try to improve one of the best game controllers on the market. Scuf Gaming, the company known for their pro-grade gaming controllers, recently released accessories that put their own take on Microsoft’s Elite controller for Xbox One and PC. The best part about these accessories is that they don’t require a special Scuf-branded Elite controller. They work on every Elite controller out there.

 

Well before Microsoft’s Elite controller for Xbox One sold more than a million units, third party companies were the ones who made high-end controllers for gaming pros. Scuf Gaming was one of those companies. Over the past several years, Scuf has made high-end controllers for the Xbox 360, PS3, Xbox One and PS4. Their lineup of current-gen pads called Infinity1 and Infinity 4PS are equipped with rear paddles, durable analog sticks and plenty of customization options like color, stick length, weight reduction and more. Players can now order and fully customize a Scuf-branded Elite controller on the company’s website, if they’re looking for a personalized touch.

 

Scuf’s Elite controllers run anywhere from $150 to over $200 depending on the customization options. This controller is worth a look for someone in the market for an Elite controller, but should certainly be overlooked if you already have one. It’s exactly the same as an existing Elite pad. It comes with the original accessories and has the hair trigger switches. It’s an Elite controller with Scuf branding and the option for color customization. But, such a controller won’t be necessary for Scuf’s new Elite accessories.

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The top 10 games of 2016

Friday, 30 December 2016 04:04

This year wasn’t a great year for life, but it was still a decent year video games. Games and tech moved forward with new trends like virtual reality. Meanwhile Sony and Microsoft teased new, more powerful consoles that may or may not replace the current models. Nintendo made a big splash in the mobile market with hits like “Pokemon GO” and more recently with “Super Mario Run.” It was a solid year with plenty of memorable experiences. Here are the best games of the year.

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ForHonorArtWhen “For Honor” was revealed at E3 2015, it was one of the most exciting games shown at Ubisoft’s press conference. That’s because it was fresh. It wasn’t another “Assassin’s Creed.” It wasn’t another “Just Dance” sequel. This new game of medieval combat looked like something different from the rest of the pack that year.

 

But looks can often be deceiving. It’s not often that an E3 trailer is met with jeers. Game trailers are framed in a way to look exciting, intriguing and fun. Fortunately for “For Honor,” the gameplay is as novel as it looked last year. This is going to be the game “Dynasty Warriors” fans have always wanted. “For Honor” is online competitive “Dynasty Warriors” with substance.

 

Ubisoft hosted a preview event to showcase the game earlier this month. After playing the game for the better part of four hours, here is everything you need to know about Ubisoft’s upcoming competitive action game.

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DeadRising4The original “Dead Rising” was not a good video game. It was a glorified tech demo that showed of the power of the Xbox 360 by throwing a bunch of zombies on the screen at once. For some strange reason, it focused on the most mundane and frustrating gameplay mechanics in all of video games: the escort mission. Fortunately, Capcom gave the game a second, third and now a fourth chance.

 

Since that first game, the series has made great strides in improving what works and taking out what doesn't, all while keeping its zany sense of humor and slapstick. “Dead Rising 4” is a shining example of just how far the series has come. Gone are the days of the stress of a constant ticking timer, slow progression, and a mind-bogglingly outdated save system. “Dead Rising 4” is all about player enjoyment, whether it’s mowing down zombies with a sledgehammer with grenades strapped to it, or putting on an mechanized Exo Suit to bring the hurt with metal fists. “Dead Rising 4” is a good time from beginning to end.

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Thanksgiving is more than time for gluttony and gladiators of the gridiron. It’s also a time of reflection. It’s a time to give thanks to the things that we take for granted. Since I don’t get paid to write about life advice or family dynamics, I thought I’d still try to relate the spirit of Thanksgiving to the things I do write about: video games.

 

There’s a lot to be thankful for in the world of video games, especially this year. The NES Classic is out and its 8-bit goodness has made it wildly more popular than Sony’s and Microsoft’s boxes that are 4K capable. VR is now readily available for the masses. But let’s dig deeper. What am I really thankful for this holiday season?

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Titanfall2

 

Most publishers and developers have competitive shooters down to a science. That science is to slightly build on the formula popularized by the “Call of Duty” series. It usually goes like this: create a progression system with plenty of modes in competitive multiplayer, and throw in a high-octane, but mostly forgettable story for the campaign. While “Titanfall 2” borrows some of that formula for this sequel, it sticks to its own lane while expanding on everything that made the original “Titanfall” a memorable experience. “Titanfall 2” makes its predecessor look like a beta test. This sequel is everything the series could be.

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PSVR Game Guide - what to buy, try and skip

Monday, 24 October 2016 13:16

 

PSVR5

 

You just dropped $500 on a PlayStation VR headset. Now you’ll need some games to go along with that shiny new piece of next-gen tech. Half a grand is no small purchase for a gaming peripheral. Crafty consumers will want to choose the games they buy wisely. Fortunately, Sony launched PSVR with a hefty launch lineup of titles, so there are a lot of options. Some of those experiences are better than others. Here are the games you should try, buy and skip for PSVR.

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ForzaHorizon3

 

What do you want in a racing game? The answer to that depends on what kind of racing game you’re a fan of. Not all racing games are created equal. It also depends on how long you’ve been playing racing games. Racing games have gone through drastic changes over the last console generation. They went from selecting races from a menu to exploring an open world. The transition from one type to the other was a bumpy one with missteps being taken by franchises like “Need for Speed” among others.


Now, seemingly every new game with cars is one with an open world racing game tries to introduce new features, but that originality has the potential to bring some aspects of a game that just aren’t fun. “Forza Horizon 3” is the biggest “Forza Horizon” yet, and while it makes an excellent first impression, annoyances come later in the experience.

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RiseofIron

 

It’s been two long years for Bungie’s shooter/loot grind/MMO called “Destiny.” Whatever genre the game gets categorized as, it’s hard to ignore the strides it’s made since it’s original release. The “Rise of Iron” expansion is its finale. It’s a culmination of everything that works for Destiny, rather than focusing on what doesn’t.

 

If you were to go back and play the original “Destiny,” often called “vanilla Destiny,” it’s hard to believe it’s even the same game when compared to its current state. Throughout these two years, Bungie increased loot drop rates, added more social areas and gave us more things to do in them. There are different events that friends can engage in like the Horde-inspired Prison of Elders, four raids and free holiday events that all “Destiny” owners can enjoy.

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Sony has officially outlined what we can expect to play on the PlayStation VR demo disc. There was a lot of discussion about what exactly players could do with their PSVR headsets right out of the box. No we know, and it’s actually a pretty impressive lineup of demos. Here’s the whole list of demos and their developers.

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