'Those Who Kill': Episode 3

Monday, 31 March 2014 09:39 AM Written by 

TWKep3After last week's news that A&E's Pittsburgh-filmed "Those Who Kill" would move to 10 p.m. Sunday on A&E's lesser, sister-network LMN, it's kind of perfect that last night's third episode -- the first to premiere on LMN -- was titled "Rocking the Boat."

Not only has the show been rocked, it's basically sunk.

It would take a miracle for "Those Who Kill" to eke out a second season at this point. But because of local interest I'll keep reviewing the episodes (at least until I can't take it anymore).

Here's the logline description for last night's episode:

“Rocking the Boat”

Following an unsolved murder, Catherine Jensen (Chloë Sevigny) and Thomas Schaeffer (James D'Arcy) team up to investigate the victim’s past and reach out to Catherine's step-father Howard Burgess (Bruce Davison) for more information on the case.  Meanwhile, the homicide team goes under cover in attempt to draw out the killer. Written  by Chris Levinson, directed by Phil Abraham.

 

Read my take on episode three after the jump. ...

The cops meet at a bar to discuss the pending case of a killer who beats his victims aftre they are dead. Then they all go to AA meetings and announce, "I got away with something and I'm afraid if I don't get caught I can get away with anything," which is particularly meaningful coming from Jensen, who got away with killing a suspect in the pilot. (Yes, it was heavy-handed.)

 

In one support group there's a guy wearing an American Eagle sweater (hometown shout-out!) but in discussing the case Schaeffer says the killer won't kill and "go back to bagging groceries at the Piggly Wiggly." So is he from the South? Should have been a Giant Eagle reference. Nope, later in the show we learn he's from Rochester, N.Y. Then again, Jensen says she has to "hit the loo." Who says that in Pittsburgh?

 

Regionalism gets more stereotypical when they go to a rural foster home and get served scrapple before Jensen finds the father chopping up something in the kitchen and then finds a guy in the creepy farmhouse basement.

 

Schaeffer meets with a student at his home office. What professor does that?

 

Sevigny goes ice skating, just like in the old "Big Love" opening credits! But here she's "just trying to clear her head" while plotting against her stepfather and looking at her missing brother's trophy.

 

Schaeffer and his wife get the first ultrasound for their baby, which makes Schaeffer think of the killer they're chasing. Naturally! Schaeffer realizes the killer is a woman who pushed a kid with a rap sheet off the 31st Street Bridge to his death. Lots of nice river views of Downtown.

 

"Look, I'm not an oracle," Schaeffer says. Could have fooled me.

 

In the midst of the murder case, Schaeffer tells Jensen she's nuts for going after her stepfather. So then Jensen calls up "cheese dad" from episode two for a quickie in a broom closet.

 

Later Jensen and Schaeffer visit Jensen's stepfather, a Pittsburgh judge, to get information on their case. He greets them warmly, as if her palpable abhorance of him is not at all obvious, which it is. He turns his wedding ring ominously. Schaeffer starts talking about false allegations against parents, making everyone uncomfortable. Jensen begins seeing her stepfather unfocused and blurry, meaning...  what exactly?

 

Local sites: 31st Street Bridge, One Allegheny Square on the North Side.

 

Newspaper of record in the killer's kitchen: Pittsburgh News Dispatch. What a rag!

 

Log in and post your thoughts -- and any recognizable locations -- below.

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