Travels Without Charley

Steinbeck Enters Minnesota

Wednesday, 07 March 2012 08:30 AM Written by
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Pat Walker, aka "The Blimp Man," didn't win his Anoka council race.
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But Walker won my vote by leading me to Sparky's.

 

"Travels Without Charley" explains in great detail how I discovered that John Steinbeck’s 1962 travel classic "Travels With Charley" – marketed and taught as a work of nonfiction for half a century -- is not a true and honest account of the cross-country trip he made in the fall of 1960. The best place to start is where I did, at the beginning.

 

“Charley” & America in Pictures

In the fall of 2010, when I retraced the road trip John Steinbeck made for his bestseller “Travels With Charley,” I took nearly 2,000 pictures of America and Americans.

I took snapshots of people I met, places I went or things I thought were interesting, pretty, funny or stupid. I photographed many places Steinbeck mentions in “Travels With Charley” as well as hotels and homes he stayed at while on his 1960 journey.

Some of my photos are pretty good, some are blurry or kind of crazy. Many were taken through my car windows at 70 mph.

Collectively they help me tell the true story of “Travels With Charley” and provide a hint of the beautiful country and good people I saw on my high-speed dash down the Steinbeck Highway.

At least one picture from my trip, starting with Steinbeck's summer home in Sag Harbor, N.Y., will be posted here each day until July 29, 2012, the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Travels With Charley in Search of America.

True Discoveries

I discovered two important truths when I set out to follow John Steinbeck’s "Travels With Charley" route in the fall of 2010. I found out Steinbeck’s iconic nonfiction book was a 50-year-old literary fraud. And I found out that despite the Great Recession and national headlines dripping with gloom and doom,  America is still a big, empty, rich, safe, clean, prosperous and friendly country. How I stumbled onto Steinbeck’s deceit and the daily account of my 11,276-mile drive from Long Island to Maine to California and back are stored in all their gory detail at Travels Without Charley. Meanwhile, I’m in the process of turning my adventures with John Steinbeck and his famous work into a book of my own. A nonfiction one.

Bill Steigerwald

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

A mini-index:

"'Travels With Charley' Timeline" is a well-linked, well-illustrated, updated timeline that pinpoints, as much as possible, the places Steinbeck was between Sept. 23, 1960, and Dec. 5, 1960, and what I wrote about them when I went there. There are photos and some short, raw, amateur but informative video clips of some of the stops I made on the Steinbeck Highway.

Why I’m Hounding Steinbeck" explains that I didn’t set out to fact-check Steinbeck or his “Charley” trip or cause the great author any grief. I just wanted to retrace his 1960 route and compare what he saw in 1960 with what I saw and then write a book about how America has and has not changed in the last 50 years.

"The Travels With Steinbeck Myth" shows how deeply the myths and fictions of Steinbeck's trip have been buried into the consciousness of American culture.


Steinbeck Highway Sunset

Tuesday, 06 March 2012 05:12 AM Written by

 

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The Steinbeck Highway has 10,000 miles of nice sunsets. This one
was in western Wisconsin on Oct. 10, 2010, on U.S. Highway 10
near the Mississippi River.

 

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"Travels Without Charley" explains in great detail how I discovered that John Steinbeck’s 1962 travel classic "Travels With 2010-10-31_16.07.09_copyCharley" – marketed and taught as a work of nonfiction for half a century -- is not a true and honest account of the cross-country trip he made in the fall of 1960. The best place to start is where I did, at the beginning.

 

“Charley” & America in Pictures

In the fall of 2010, when I retraced the road trip John Steinbeck made for his bestseller “Travels With Charley,” I took nearly 2,000 pictures of America and Americans.

I took snapshots of people I met, places I went or things I thought were interesting, pretty, funny or stupid. I photographed many places Steinbeck mentions in “Travels With Charley” as well as hotels and homes he stayed at while on his 1960 journey.

Some of my photos are pretty good, some are blurry or kind of crazy. Many were taken through my car windows at 70 mph.

Collectively they help me tell the true story of “Travels With Charley” and provide a hint of the beautiful country and good people I saw on my high-speed dash down the Steinbeck Highway.

At least one picture from my trip, starting with Steinbeck's summer home in Sag Harbor, N.Y., will be posted here each day until July 29, 2012, the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Travels With Charley in Search of America."

 


A mini-index:

It's time to wish the book a happy birthday: "'Travels With Charley' Turns 50."

"'Travels With Charley' Timeline" is a well-linked, well-illustrated, updated timeline that pinpoints, as much as possible, the places Steinbeck was between Sept. 23, 1960, and Dec. 5, 1960, and what I wrote about them when I went there. There are photos and some short, raw, amateur but informative video clips of some of the stops I made on the Steinbeck Highway.

-- "Cutting the First Draft of 'Charley'" details what I found when I went to the Morgan Library in New York City and compared Steinbeck's original "Charley" manuscript with the version that was published in 1962.

-- "'Charley's' 'Lost' Last Chapter" discusses why it made sense to cut the book's original final chapter,  "L'Envoi," which recounted Steinbeck's attendance at John Kennedy's inauguration ceremony Jan. 20, 1961.

Like Steinbeck, I drove through New England to the top of Maine and then out to Seattle and California and back. Some good photos and links to my eight print-side travel stories for the Post-Gazette are at “America Looks Good From Steinbeck’s Highway.”

Steinbeck's Wisconsin -- and mine

Monday, 05 March 2012 03:04 AM Written by
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Steinbeck and I passed many of the same corners and towns in
Wisconsin, 50 years apart. This intersection is south of Baraboo,
where circuses used to spend the winter.
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Baraboo, a U.S. 12 town, was dressing up its downtown for autumn.
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On U.S. Highway 12, which Steinbeck and I took, I passed what he
passed. I stopped to eat at the German Haus, which was a gas station-
burger joint in 1960.
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Rolf Kurandt, the German Haus' owner, told me great stories about
growing up in Germany during World War II. He remembers seeing
Hitler as an 8 year old.
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Steinbeck drove through Merrillan, but missed a good breakfast here.
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I sneaked one of my favorite photos in the Merrillan Cafe, where some
of the regular farm boys were eating on a Sunday morning.

"Travels Without Charley" explains in great detail how I discovered that John Steinbeck’s 1962 travel classic "Travels With 2010-10-31_16.07.09_copyCharley" – marketed and taught as a work of nonfiction for half a century -- is not a true and honest account of the cross-country trip he made in the fall of 1960. The best place to start is where I did, at the beginning.

 

“Charley” & America in Pictures

In the fall of 2010, when I retraced the road trip John Steinbeck made for his bestseller “Travels With Charley,” I took nearly 2,000 pictures of America and Americans.

I took snapshots of people I met, places I went or things I thought were interesting, pretty, funny or stupid. I photographed many places Steinbeck mentions in “Travels With Charley” as well as hotels and homes he stayed at while on his 1960 journey.

Some of my photos are pretty good, some are blurry or kind of crazy. Many were taken through my car windows at 70 mph.

Collectively they help me tell the true story of “Travels With Charley” and provide a hint of the beautiful country and good people I saw on my high-speed dash down the Steinbeck Highway.

At least one picture from my trip, starting with Steinbeck's summer home in Sag Harbor, N.Y., will be posted here each day until July 29, 2012, the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Travels With Charley in Search of America."

 

I'd like to thank the New York Times...

 

The New York Times liked what I learned about Steinbeck and "Charley." It started with a swell April 4, 2011, article about my Steinbeck "scoop" in the Sunday Book section -- "A Reality Check for Steinbeck and Charley."

Then came a shocking in-house editorial Headlined "The Truth About Charley." It cogently credited me with having made an "intriguing" and "disheartening" discovery about the high level of untruth and dishonesty in "TWC" and expressed irritation that Steinbeck scholars were so blase about it.

The Times concluded its opinion with arguably the greatest editorial paragraph it has written since it came out against the federal income tax in the late 1800s:

"Steinbeck insisted his book was reality-based. He aimed to 'tell the small diagnostic truths which are the foundations of the larger truth.' Books labeled 'nonfiction' should not break faith with readers. Not now, and not in 1962, the year 'Travels With Charley' came out and Steinbeck won the Nobel Prize for literature."

A mini-index:

It's time to wish the book a happy birthday: "'Travels With Charley' Turns 50."

"'Travels With Charley' Timeline" is a well-linked, well-illustrated, updated timeline that pinpoints, as much as possible, the places Steinbeck was between Sept. 23, 1960, and Dec. 5, 1960, and what I wrote about them when I went there. There are photos and some short, raw, amateur but informative video clips of some of the stops I made on the Steinbeck Highway.

-- "Cutting the First Draft of 'Charley'" details what I found when I went to the Morgan Library in New York City and compared Steinbeck's original "Charley" manuscript with the version that was published in 1962.

-- "'Charley's' 'Lost' Last Chapter" discusses why it made sense to cut the book's original final chapter,  "L'Envoi," which recounted Steinbeck's attendance at John Kennedy's inauguration ceremony Jan. 20, 1961.

-- In "John Steinbeck's Fall of Discontent," quotes pulled from some of Steinbeck's letters show that he was a lot more bummed out about the country and people he met on his trip than he let on in the pages of "Charley."

-- As "John Steinbeck and 1960 America" shows, the USA was a much simpler, poorer, squarer place when Steinbeck went out to rediscover it in 1960.

-- And finally, in "John Steinbeck & Me -- Mile 1" I recall that my road trip actually started six months before my tires started turning, as I sat shivering on top of Steinbeck's favorite mountain, Fremont Peak, in the Monterey Peninsula.

Like Steinbeck, I drove through New England to the top of Maine and then out to Seattle and California and back. Some good photos and links to my eight print-side travel stories for the Post-Gazette are at “America Looks Good From Steinbeck’s Highway.”  

Steinbeck's First Truck Stop

Saturday, 03 March 2012 10:07 PM Written by
 
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Steinbeck probably parked his pickup-camper combo for the night
at a truck stop where Brenner Tank Services is now.

"Travels Without Charley" explains in great detail how I discovered that John Steinbeck’s 1962 travel classic "Travels With 2010-10-31_16.07.09_copyCharley" – marketed and taught as a work of nonfiction for half a century -- is not a true and honest account of the cross-country trip he made in the fall of 1960. The best place to start is where I did, at the beginning.

 

“Charley” & America in Pictures

In the fall of 2010, when I retraced the road trip John Steinbeck made for his bestseller “Travels With Charley,” I took nearly 2,000 pictures of America and Americans.

I took snapshots of people I met, places I went or things I thought were interesting, pretty, funny or stupid. I photographed many places Steinbeck mentions in “Travels With Charley” as well as hotels and homes he stayed at while on his 1960 journey.

Some of my photos are pretty good, some are blurry or kind of crazy. Many were taken through my car windows at 70 mph.

Collectively they help me tell the true story of “Travels With Charley” and provide a hint of the beautiful country and good people I saw on my high-speed dash down the Steinbeck Highway.

At least one picture from my trip, starting with Steinbeck's summer home in Sag Harbor, N.Y., will be posted here each day until July 29, 2012, the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Travels With Charley in Search of America.


A mini-index:

"'Travels With Charley' Timeline" is a well-linked, well-illustrated, updated timeline that pinpoints, as much as possible, the places Steinbeck was between Sept. 23, 1960, and Dec. 5, 1960, and what I wrote about them when I went there. There are photos and some short, raw, amateur but informative video clips of some of the stops I made on the Steinbeck Highway.

-- "Cutting the First Draft of 'Charley'" details what I found when I went to the Morgan Library in New York City and compared Steinbeck's original "Charley" manuscript with the version that was published in 1962.

-- "'Charley's' 'Lost' Last Chapter" discusses why it made sense to cut the book's original final chapter,  "L'Envoi," which recounted Steinbeck's attendance at John Kennedy's inauguration ceremony Jan. 20, 1961.

-- "Discrediting the Discrediting of John Steinbeck" is my reaction to criticism from the country's top Steinbeck scholar, San Jose State English professor Susan Shillinglaw. In the Jan. 20, 2011, cover story in the Monterey County Weekly, the alternative paper-of-record for "Steinbeck Country," Shillinglaw questioned the documentation and worth of my "Charley" fact-checking expedition. I wrote this letter to the Weekly in my defense.

-- In "John Steinbeck's Fall of Discontent," quotes pulled from some of Steinbeck's letters show that he was a lot more bummed out about the country and people he met on his trip than he let on in the pages of "Charley."

-- As "John Steinbeck and 1960 America" shows, the USA was a much simpler, poorer, squarer place when Steinbeck went out to rediscover it in 1960.

-- And finally, in "John Steinbeck & Me -- Mile 1" I recall that my road trip actually started six months before my tires started turning, as I sat shivering on top of Steinbeck's favorite mountain, Fremont Peak, in the Monterey Peninsula.

If you want to start my road trip where I did -- from my house south of Pittsburgh -- see "Chasing Steinbeck's Ghost."

If you want to begin at dawn on Sept. 23, 2010, when I pulled out of Steinbeck’s driveway in Sag Harbor, Long Island, exactly 50 years after he did, start with “Hitting the Steinbeck Highway."

Like Steinbeck, I drove through New England to the top of Maine and then out to Seattle and California and back. Some good photos and links to my eight print-side travel stories for the Post-Gazette are at “America Looks Good From Steinbeck’s Highway.”

 


The Steinbecks Sleep Over at Adlai's

Friday, 02 March 2012 09:24 PM Written by

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"Travels Without Charley" explains in great detail how I discovered that John Steinbeck’s 1962 travel classic "Travels With 2010-10-31_16.07.09_copyCharley" – marketed and taught as a work of nonfiction for half a century -- is not a true and honest account of the cross-country trip he made in the fall of 1960. The best place to start is where I did, at the beginning.

 

“Charley” & America in Pictures

In the fall of 2010, when I retraced the road trip John Steinbeck made for his bestseller “Travels With Charley,” I took nearly 2,000 pictures of America and Americans.

I took snapshots of people I met, places I went or things I thought were interesting, pretty, funny or stupid. I photographed many places Steinbeck mentions in “Travels With Charley” as well as hotels and homes he stayed at while on his 1960 journey.

Some of my photos are pretty good, some are blurry or kind of crazy. Many were taken through my car windows at 70 mph.

Collectively they help me tell the true story of “Travels With Charley” and provide a hint of the beautiful country and good people I saw on my high-speed dash down the Steinbeck Highway.

At least one picture from my trip, starting with Steinbeck's summer home in Sag Harbor, N.Y., will be posted here each day until July 29, 2012, the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Travels With Charley in Search of America.


A mini-index:

"'Travels With Charley' Timeline" is a well-linked, well-illustrated, updated timeline that pinpoints, as much as possible, the places Steinbeck was between Sept. 23, 1960, and Dec. 5, 1960, and what I wrote about them when I went there. There are photos and some short, raw, amateur but informative video clips of some of the stops I made on the Steinbeck Highway.

-- "Cutting the First Draft of 'Charley'" details what I found when I went to the Morgan Library in New York City and compared Steinbeck's original "Charley" manuscript with the version that was published in 1962.

-- "'Charley's' 'Lost' Last Chapter" discusses why it made sense to cut the book's original final chapter,  "L'Envoi," which recounted Steinbeck's attendance at John Kennedy's inauguration ceremony Jan. 20, 1961.

-- "Discrediting the Discrediting of John Steinbeck" is my reaction to criticism from the country's top Steinbeck scholar, San Jose State English professor Susan Shillinglaw. In the Jan. 20, 2011, cover story in the Monterey County Weekly, the alternative paper-of-record for "Steinbeck Country," Shillinglaw questioned the documentation and worth of my "Charley" fact-checking expedition. I wrote this letter to the Weekly in my defense.

-- In "John Steinbeck's Fall of Discontent," quotes pulled from some of Steinbeck's letters show that he was a lot more bummed out about the country and people he met on his trip than he let on in the pages of "Charley."

-- As "John Steinbeck and 1960 America" shows, the USA was a much simpler, poorer, squarer place when Steinbeck went out to rediscover it in 1960.

-- And finally, in "John Steinbeck & Me -- Mile 1" I recall that my road trip actually started six months before my tires started turning, as I sat shivering on top of Steinbeck's favorite mountain, Fremont Peak, in the Monterey Peninsula.

If you want to start my road trip where I did -- from my house south of Pittsburgh -- see "Chasing Steinbeck's Ghost."

If you want to begin at dawn on Sept. 23, 2010, when I pulled out of Steinbeck’s driveway in Sag Harbor, Long Island, exactly 50 years after he did, start with “Hitting the Steinbeck Highway."

Like Steinbeck, I drove through New England to the top of Maine and then out to Seattle and California and back. Some good photos and links to my eight print-side travel stories for the Post-Gazette are at “America Looks Good From Steinbeck’s Highway.”

 

 

Steinbeck's Pump Room

Thursday, 01 March 2012 06:52 PM Written by

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The Ambassador East used to have the Ambassador West across
the street. Steinbeck left Chicago and sprinted to Seattle in seven days.

 

"Travels Without Charley" explains in great detail how I discovered that John Steinbeck’s 1962 travel classic "Travels With 2010-10-31_16.07.09_copyCharley" – marketed and taught as a work of nonfiction for half a century -- is not a true and honest account of the cross-country trip he made in the fall of 1960. The best place to start is where I did, at the beginning.

 

“Charley” & America in Pictures

In the fall of 2010, when I retraced the road trip John Steinbeck made for his bestseller “Travels With Charley,” I took nearly 2,000 pictures of America and Americans.

I took snapshots of people I met, places I went or things I thought were interesting, pretty, funny or stupid. I photographed many places Steinbeck mentions in “Travels With Charley” as well as hotels and homes he stayed at while on his 1960 journey.

Some of my photos are pretty good, some are blurry or kind of crazy. Many were taken through my car windows at 70 mph.

Collectively they help me tell the true story of “Travels With Charley” and provide a hint of the beautiful country and good people I saw on my high-speed dash down the Steinbeck Highway.

At least one picture from my trip, starting with Steinbeck's summer home in Sag Harbor, N.Y., will be posted here each day until July 29, 2012, the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Travels With Charley in Search of America.


A mini-index:

"'Travels With Charley' Timeline" is a well-linked, well-illustrated, updated timeline that pinpoints, as much as possible, the places Steinbeck was between Sept. 23, 1960, and Dec. 5, 1960, and what I wrote about them when I went there. There are photos and some short, raw, amateur but informative video clips of some of the stops I made on the Steinbeck Highway.

Why I’m Hounding Steinbeck" explains that I didn’t set out to fact-check Steinbeck or his “Charley” trip or cause the great author any grief. I just wanted to retrace his 1960 route and compare what he saw in 1960 with what I saw and then write a book about how America has and has not changed in the last 50 years.

"The Travels With Steinbeck Myth" shows how deeply the myths and fictions of Steinbeck's trip have been buried into the consciousness of American culture.

Steinbeck Does Chicago

Wednesday, 29 February 2012 11:03 PM Written by
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Steinbeck arrived in Chicago on about Oct. 5, 1960, and checked
into the Ambassador East Hotel.

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"Travels Without Charley" explains in great detail how I discovered that John Steinbeck’s 1962 travel classic "Travels With 2010-10-31_16.07.09_copyCharley" – marketed and taught as a work of nonfiction for half a century -- is not a true and honest account of the cross-country trip he made in the fall of 1960. The best place to start is where I did, at the beginning.

 

“Charley” & America in Pictures

In the fall of 2010, when I retraced the road trip John Steinbeck made for his bestseller “Travels With Charley,” I took nearly 2,000 pictures of America and Americans.

I took snapshots of people I met, places I went or things I thought were interesting, pretty, funny or stupid. I photographed many places Steinbeck mentions in “Travels With Charley” as well as hotels and homes he stayed at while on his 1960 journey.

Some of my photos are pretty good, some are blurry or kind of crazy. Many were taken through my car windows at 70 mph.

Collectively they help me tell the true story of “Travels With Charley” and provide a hint of the beautiful country and good people I saw on my high-speed dash down the Steinbeck Highway.

At least one picture from my trip, starting with Steinbeck's summer home in Sag Harbor, N.Y., will be posted here each day until July 29, 2012, the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Travels With Charley in Search of America.

True Discoveries

I discovered two important truths when I set out to follow John Steinbeck’s "Travels With Charley" route in the fall of 2010. I found out Steinbeck’s iconic nonfiction book was a 50-year-old literary fraud. And I found out that despite the Great Recession and national headlines dripping with gloom and doom,  America is still a big, empty, rich, safe, clean, prosperous and friendly country. How I stumbled onto Steinbeck’s deceit and the daily account of my 11,276-mile drive from Long Island to Maine to California and back are stored in all their gory detail at Travels Without Charley. Meanwhile, I’m in the process of turning my adventures with John Steinbeck and his famous work into a book of my own. A nonfiction one.

Bill Steigerwald

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

A mini-index:

"'Travels With Charley' Timeline" is a well-linked, well-illustrated, updated timeline that pinpoints, as much as possible, the places Steinbeck was between Sept. 23, 1960, and Dec. 5, 1960, and what I wrote about them when I went there. There are photos and some short, raw, amateur but informative video clips of some of the stops I made on the Steinbeck Highway.

Why I’m Hounding Steinbeck" explains that I didn’t set out to fact-check Steinbeck or his “Charley” trip or cause the great author any grief. I just wanted to retrace his 1960 route and compare what he saw in 1960 with what I saw and then write a book about how America has and has not changed in the last 50 years.

"The Travels With Steinbeck Myth" shows how deeply the myths and fictions of Steinbeck's trip have been buried into the consciousness of American culture.


Steinbeck Crosses Ohio

Tuesday, 28 February 2012 09:16 PM Written by
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Steinbeck went from Buffalo on the N.Y. Thruway, then crossed Ohio on U.S. 20, starting at Madison, where the interstate ended, and going through towns like Willoughby and Cleveland.

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McDonald's --  free wi-fi and reliable coffee, coast to coast.
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Bellevue Ohio -- a U.S. 20 town that's been there a long time.
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Farms -- The Midwest is very full of them, starting in Ohio.
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Maumee -- a Toledo suburb with an old U.S. 20 theater
Steinbeck passed on his way to Indiana and Chicago.
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Indiana? Ohio? What's the diff? It was flat, farmy and unpeopled.

 

"Travels Without Charley" explains in great detail how I discovered that John Steinbeck’s 1962 travel classic "Travels With 2010-10-31_16.07.09_copyCharley" – marketed and taught as a work of nonfiction for half a century -- is not a true and honest account of the cross-country trip he made in the fall of 1960. The best place to start is where I did, at the beginning.


“Charley” & America in Pictures

In the fall of 2010, when I retraced the road trip John Steinbeck made for his bestseller “Travels With Charley,” I took nearly 2,000 pictures of America and Americans.

I took snapshots of people I met, places I went or things I thought were interesting, pretty, funny or stupid. I photographed many places Steinbeck mentions in “Travels With Charley” as well as hotels and homes he stayed at while on his 1960 journey.

Some of my photos are pretty good, some are blurry or kind of crazy. Many were taken through my car windows at 70 mph.

Collectively they help me tell the true story of “Travels With Charley” and provide a hint of the beautiful country and good people I saw on my high-speed dash down the Steinbeck Highway.

At least one picture from my trip, starting with Steinbeck's summer home in Sag Harbor, N.Y., will be posted here each day until July 29, 2012, the 50th anniversary of the publication of "Travels With Charley in Search of America.

True Discoveries

I discovered two important truths when I set out to follow John Steinbeck’s "Travels With Charley" route in the fall of 2010. I found out Steinbeck’s iconic nonfiction book was a 50-year-old literary fraud. And I found out that despite the Great Recession and national headlines dripping with gloom and doom,  America is still a big, empty, rich, safe, clean, prosperous and friendly country. How I stumbled onto Steinbeck’s deceit and the daily account of my 11,276-mile drive from Long Island to Maine to California and back are stored in all their gory detail at Travels Without Charley. Meanwhile, I’m in the process of turning my adventures with John Steinbeck and his famous work into a book of my own. A nonfiction one.

Bill Steigerwald

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

A mini-index:

"'Travels With Charley' Timeline" is a well-linked, well-illustrated, updated timeline that pinpoints, as much as possible, the places Steinbeck was between Sept. 23, 1960, and Dec. 5, 1960, and what I wrote about them when I went there. There are photos and some short, raw, amateur but informative video clips of some of the stops I made on the Steinbeck Highway.

Why I’m Hounding Steinbeck" explains that I didn’t set out to fact-check Steinbeck or his “Charley” trip or cause the great author any grief. I just wanted to retrace his 1960 route and compare what he saw in 1960 with what I saw and then write a book about how America has and has not changed in the last 50 years.

"The Travels With Steinbeck Myth" shows how deeply the myths and fictions of Steinbeck's trip have been buried into the consciousness of American culture.


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