Get Rhythm

Review: 'Elvis: The Complete RCA Albums'

Wednesday, 23 March 2016 09:05 AM Written by

 

elvis complete albums

Last week, Legacy Recordings released Elvis Presley: The Complete RCA Albums, a boxed, 60-CD collection (not available on download) comprising all of Presley's released RCA Victor albums during his lifetime, beginning with Elvis Presley (1956) and Moody Blue, released in July, 1977, less than a month before his death from prescription drug abuse.   Conceived to mark the 60th Anniversary of his first RCA album, it's not a package aimed at the casual fan (there are many fine introductory packages that cover that era nicely).  This is, without question, a collection for the hardcore, whose appreciation differs from those who enjoy only the earliest material, or the "comeback" recordings of the 60's, the gospel material or even the movie soundtracks, which everyone agrees had ample throwaways with gems buried within.

Join the conversation:

 

SPOILER ALERT! Do not read unless you've watched last night's episode of Better Call Saul, titled "Bali Ha'i."

Join the conversation:

Jerry Lee Lewis, as much of the world knows, got in trouble for marrying his cousin Myra Gale Brown in 1959.  Myra's father, J.W. Brown, was Jerry Lee's cousin and bass player.  At some point during Jerry's time with Sun Records, J.W. Brown and J.R Brown, surely a relative, using only an upright bass and guitar recorded this simple, wonderfully goofy drinking song  at the Sun Studio at 706 Union Avenue in Memphis.   J.W. is, naturally on bass, J.R playing guitar. It was recorded in late 1956 or early 1957, very likely while fooling around during a break at a Jerry Lee Lewis recording session, almost surely just for fun.  The lyrics speak for themselves. 

Sun's owner Sam Phillips, clearly didn't hear the hit potential.  It was never released--probably never intended to be. It wound up uncovered decades by researchers working on an LP compilation of rare and obscure Sun country material.   No matter. It gives new meaning to the term "acoustic singer-songwriter."


"Drunk!"

 

 

Join the conversation:

 My review of "C&O Canal," Americana duo Eric Brace and Peter Cooper's homage to Washington DC's highly influential  bluegrass and folk scene.

Join the conversation:

SPOILER WARNING: Do not read unless/until you've seen Monday's Episode of Better Call Saul  (just renewed for a third season), titled "Rebecca."

Join the conversation:

 

Ernestine Anderson, who died March 10 at age 87, was a masterful jazz vocalist with a special feel for the blues. You can read about her life in this extensive obit in the Seattle Times. We'll do something else.

Join the conversation:

 

Join the conversation:

George Martin: His Work Before The Beatles

Thursday, 10 March 2016 06:45 AM Written by

It's been noted, but perhaps not detailed.  Sir George Martin, the erudite and articulate producer for EMI's Parlophone label who died earlier this week, made history by supervising-guiding the Beatles' recordings from 1962-1970. Martin, however, was much more. In his day, he was one of England's innovative record creators before meeting and deciding to sign the boys in 1962.  Parlophone was long characterized as EMI's low-end label.  Not so, and Martin was recording both conventional and unconventional materai there early on.

Join the conversation:

Page 2 of 64