Get Rhythm

Today's "Believe Your Ears" PG music podcast features my review of Ronnie Milsap's new album Summer Number Seventeen, an album of newly recorded versions of R&B, country and pop oldies, not unlike Martina McBride's new R&B cover album Everlasting.  The singer appears at the Palace Theater in Greensburg on May 18.

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Sunday night's Season Seven premiere of Mad Men began in January, 1969, yet the two songs included were each hits two years earlier: The Spencer Davis Group's "I'm A Man" and at the show's end, as Peggy melts down on her apartment floor, Vanilla Fudge's reimagination of the Supremes' "You Keep My Hangin' On."

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'Mad Men' Weekly Music Discussions Resume Monday

Saturday, 12 April 2014 09:06 AM Written by

My Monday morning discussions of various historical songs featured in Mad Men episodes proved pretty popular last year. So I'll resume posting Monday mornings, following the Season 1 (Part 1) premiere Sunday.  If you weren't around last season, I'd look at the history and circumstances of songs used on the show, who wrote them and originally recorded them, with added context on the circumstances and my opinion how the song (or songs) fit ioto a given episode.  The first episode this season starts in January of 1969 (when I was in the final semester of my Senior year of high school), so we'll just have to take them as they come.

This is an example from last year.

 

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Today's "Believe Your Ears" Music Podcast reviews Young Guns, a never-released 1968-69 performance by the Gene Ludwig-Pat Martino Trio, a classic Organ Trio led by the late Pittsburgh Hammond B-3 master Gene Ludwig, who died in 2010. 

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Amid all the Mickey Rooney film comedies and his Emmy-award winning starring role as a mentally disabled man in the TV movie Bill,  one of his most memorable roles is often forgotten, and it's my personal favorite: his portrayal of ruthless, psychotic comic and TV mega-star Sammy Hogarth, a former vaudeville funnyman,  in Rod Serling's teleplay The Comedian, adapted from Ernest Lehman's 1952 noveletteThis 1957 dramatic presentation that was one of the high points of the prestigious 1950's live TV dramatic anthology Playhouse 90, a program considered a gem of the first Golden Age of Television.  Other memorable Playhouse 90 adaptations by Serling included Requiem For A Heavyweight, starring the late Jack Palance.

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